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Tramadol Articles

Is Tramadol dangerous?

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admin 25 January, 2009
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Not if taken correctly. Tramadol is similar to morphine and is classified as a synthetic opioid. It is prescribed frequently for pain treatment over a long period of time, especially for osteoarthritis and lower back pain. Under no circumstances should patients take this medication if they are allergic to its ingredients, have had prior episodes of anaphylactic shock or have demonstrated hypersensitivity to the drug previously. Doctors refuse to give patients who are addicts this drug for obvious reasons.

How can you tell if a person is having an allergic reaction? Possible indicators are skin eruptions, severe dyspnea, swollen body parts (normally the face or throat). The signs include mild red spots on the skin to more severe development of vesicles and desquamation. There will be lowered blood pressure and a weak pulse, and other symptoms will continue to appear until the patient passes out or goes into shock. Before taking Tramadol, find out if you are allergic; otherwise, you may experience harmful or even fatal consequences. Read the rest of this entry

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Is Tramadol the Right Drug for You?

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admin 25 January, 2009
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Now that the concept of pain management is firmly in place, doctors have a good arsenal of drugs to call upon in the treatment of chronic pain. The methods and variety of drugs used for the treatment of the central nervous system has greatly increased. When treating moderate to severe pain, Tramadol may be appropriately administered intravenously, intramuscularly, or in oral dosage. It is a synthetic opioid that has been found effective when used in these manners.

Doctors still hail morphine as the drug of choice in treatment of severe chronic pain from a variety of causes. Running close second are Tramadol, and pethidine, a similar opioid drug. Both have demonstrated efficiency in the management of chronic pain. Because Tramadol is less likely to cause respiratory depression and other adverse reactions that frequently occur with other opioid medications, it is a preferred treatment for moderate pain. Read the rest of this entry

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When Does a Lot Become Too Much?

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admin 25 January, 2009
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After being involved in a motorcycle accident that left me with severe neck pain was when I first took Tramadol. Since I had previously abused various opioid analgesics including those based on hydrocodone and acetaminophen, it was suggested that I give this specific drug a try. Due to having a low potential for being addictive, my doctor suggested Tramadol to me due to my past substance abuse problems. He suggested I request refills when need be but to not consider ingesting other medications concurrently.

The dose was minimal to start — 50 mg per day — which had virtually no effect on the excruciating pain I was experiencing. Gradually I increased the number of pills that I was taking, upping the dosage to 350 or even 400 mg each day. The pain had vanished, no question, but the drug’s effect seemed to disappear rapidly. I required more as I understood the body had become accustomed to the ingestion of Tramadol; to be able to receive equivalent pain-killing effects I needed to increase the dose yet again. What occurred? This is something that you do not want to know. Read the rest of this entry

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