Walking Therapy for Health Issues

Researchers who have studied the human anatomy in detail marvel about how aptly the human body is designed for walking. The joints, the muscles and the structure of the body in general is made for walking long miles just like our ancestors did on a daily basis. Walking in fact is an activity that we are truly born to do from the start without the need for an external stimulus. And for vast majority of human history, people walked for everything from food gathering to going places. Ten miles of walk each day was the norm back then before their dependence on vehicle began. Today, people travel an average of 40 miles per day by cars but walk less than a mile.

Because human bodies are made to walk long distance, and because it is something that anyone can do unless they have a disability in the legs, walking is an ideal treatment for health conditions ranging from muscle pain to heart disease and diabetes. Walking does all the difference when it comes to mental health as well. It serves as an antidepressant and can be the first line of defense for health issues originating as a result. Walking has a potent effect in people who are otherwise inactive and less productive. In one of the studies conducted by health experts, and through tests, diagnosis, scans and an mri imaging kenai ak, there are evidences that a brisk walk just enough to pump up the heart rate into the aerobic range is enough to protect the body against many illnesses. Going beyond this range will work wonders for the brain.

In light of all these findings, many health professionals suggest walking as the first step to begin the healing process of body and mind. It is a great workout routine for beginners and can take the place of antidepressant medications, pain pills and body therapies as well. However, walking is not a one-size-fit all cure for everyone, especially those who cannot walk due to illness or injury. If this is the case, consult your physician for a better alternative form of exercise that your body can withstand. Likewise, some people are already involved in two or three activities that they feel comfortable adding to their daily workout chart. That’s fine too as long as it is professionally recommended.

So, how long does it take to walk or perform other suitable activities in a week? The ideal time is 90 minutes, in which the first 5 minutes should be spent warming up the body. It is during this warm up session that your heart rate will reach the aerobic range and remain there. At this point, you will have enough energy and motivation to continue walking or exercising further for the rest of that 90 minutes. What is important here is being consistent with the form of exercise you have chosen to do. Try to keep your pulse rate at a reasonable level – ideally at around 75% of your maximum threshold.